The New Inn


T h e   N e w   I n n

a t   H a d l o w   D o w n


We usually end the day at a pub in the area we happen to be carrying out a Trek in, but I thought that this pub was a wee bit special and deserved a page all for itself.

The New Inn at Hadlow Down is quite unlike any pub I have ever been in before, because it is virtually unchanged since the day it was built and is one of the best Victorian pubs I have ever come across - a real gem.

Also, they served Lager and spirits as well as the usual flatulence enducing liquid treacle, so Ghost didn't get thrown out :o) 

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History of The New Inn, as viewed on www.hadlowdown.com

The present 'New Inn' stands on the site of a previous hostelry also called 'The New Inn' which was probably built in the first quarter of the 19th.century.  In the mid-1880's a fire destroyed the old building in 'suspicious circumstances'.  It was started just as the bailiffs were in taking away anything saleable. The rebuilding design was undertaken by Denman of Brighton.  Throughout the latter half of the 20th. century the pub earned itself a reputation which could be described either as 'enviable' or 'non-enviable' depending on what the customer's idea of a village pub should be! 
The New Inn is not the only 'watering hole' the village has known, the oldest one probably existed for around 300 years before it served its last pint in 1900.  It was known as 'The Spotted Cow' and was situated in the lane that still bears its name.  'Loudwell', in Tinker's Lane was once an ale house famed for its home brewed beer, its old sign post was dug up in 1969.  The 'Stonemason's Arms' was once what is now 'The Haven', it lost its license when the new 'New Inn' opened

 The New Inn has retained virtually all of it's period features, my favourite being the open fire. The shelving and bar are all as it would have appeared originally and there are 4 vintage porcelain barrels (labelled brandy, whiskey, rum and gin) behind the counter as seen in the photos above left and below. There is a good selection of real ales on tap as well as a lot of other wines, lagers, ciders, bottled beers and spirits. 

Above the bar is a fascinating shelf containing a variety of old (and unopened) beer bottles, some unusually named items (such as 'Old Fart') and a lot of interesting beers from other countries. It is almost like standing in your own front room compared to some of the pubs I've been in.

The New Inn plays host to a very varied and colourful social calender, from the weekly Fish&Chips night, through to Steam Rallies and Morris Dancing.

Externally, very little of the building has been modified, if anything the whole village looks like it has been stuck in a timewarp from the 1930's - there is a small village store nearby and a village church and graveyard a short distance up the road. Were it not for the traffic on the main road, one could almost picture the village life going on around the pub.


Externally, very little of the building has been modified, if anything the whole village looks like it has been stuck in a timewarp from the 1930's - there is a small village store nearby and a village church and graveyard a short distance up the road. Were it not for the traffic on the main road, one could almost picture the village life going on around the pub. 

If you are looking for something a little different next time you are out and about, the ghost-trains crew heartily recommend The New Inn as a pub that is well worth experiencing.